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Updated June 2012

T. E. Lawrence to Frederic Manning


2.  v.  30 

[15 lines omitted] The Epicurus1 is being read by me, very gradually. Only I began with Epicurus himself and will read the introduction last. It seems fairer to the old man to see him with my own eyes before you tell me of him. Not so? [7 lines omitted

Your letter about A.E. was pleasing. Thanks to Mrs Bernard Shaw I had been to nearly two years a reader of his Irish Statesman, a little paper he has been doing in Dublin. Of course A.E. is a wonderful poet, and great man. You'll have noted that even George Moore cannot say anything caddish about him; but his paper was something special. He wrote everything in it which mattered, and his stuff glimmered like a candle-light against a background of intense darkness. I got the fancy, when the Statesman stopped, that Ireland had gone out. He seemed the only civil intelligence there! 

It may have been because his Protestantism isolated him in a clerical country: but all I can say is that A.E. seemed to be very different from the rest of the world. He is almost a most sane, moderate, wise and original critic, who criticises as a workman, not as a scientist. That is refreshing. I'm told that he is old now, and tired. Anyway I know he is remarkable. We had better not meet, for my talking, that he wished to hear, isn't any good. I'm not Irish enough for that!

Yours,

T.E.S.

1. A new edition of Morals by Epicurus containing an introduction by Frederic Manning.

Source: DG 688-9
Checked: dn/
Last revised: 28 October 2008


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