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T. E. Lawrence to his mother


[Bovington]

9.V.24

There, I've gone out tonight and bought six penny stamps, and stuck one on each of six envelopes. So that in future it will not be so frightfully difficult to write to you. Your papers are ordered, and I hope being sent to you, now. I'll go over to Dorchester tomorrow and make sure.

W.H. Smith & Son, East St. Dorchester Dorset, in case you wish to make any alteration or difference in them. Sorry your boxes got so hurt by water. I hope you haven't lost anything irreplaceable. Were the books good ones? I can send you more, as you require them. Little news here. Trenchard sent for me, the other day. I went up, hoping to hear something about my getting back to the R.A.F. but all that he wanted me for was to offer me the writing of the R.A.F. history of the war... the thing of which Raleigh did one volume, and whose continuation Mr. Hogarth lately laid down, after a year spent in working at it. Of course it's a very difficult thing to do, and D.G H. has been a sick man lately. The diabetes opened the way to all sorts of minor ailments, so that he is now feeling fully his age: indeed I suspect that he will never be quite right again: and in the circumstances he was wise to give up so exacting a job. Of course it is out of the question that I should take it over. I heard the other day from Arnie, who is still in New York, but may come to England next month. He thinks afterwards of going on to Germany and Greece: but if he stays in this country any length of time will try and make time to visit me here. I've just put a bed in one room of my cottage at Clouds Hill, so that he can camp out there if he wishes to be quiet. There are books in the place, and nothing to do. No news at all. A Labour Government is like any other: and this isn't a Government. It's a conspiracy on the part of Liberals and Conservatives to dodge the responsibility of office! No act can be made without the consent of all three parties!

N.

Source: HL 357
Checked: jw/
Last revised: 12 February 2006


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